Evaluating Wine by Smell – Wine Tasting Tips by Randi Glazer

Evaluating wine by smell is one of the three steps in wine tasting. The first is via sight, and third is by taste. We will cover how to taste wine via smell. Here are a few things to consider when tasting wine via smell, but before we go into detail, you need to remember one thing. Never bury your nose in your glass, rather hover above it instead.

  • There are a few off-aromas that you need to look for. A corked wine will smell musty and taste like wet paper. If your wine smells like burnt matches, it means it was bottled with a heavy dose of SO2. If you swirl the wine, this smell will dissipate. If your wine smells like vinegar, it means it has volatile acidity, and if your wine smells like nail polish, then you are smelling ethyl acetate.
  • The most common aroma in wine will be a fruity aroma because wine is made from grapes. This isn’t always the case, though, especially if your wine is very cold, sweet, or old. Some grapes will carry floral, herb, or earthy scent. All of this depends on the type of wine that you are tasting and the region that it was made in.
  • When tasting wine, remember the smells because you want to build a database of smells. You can use this database as a reference point when ordering wine. You will be able to tell if the wine is still in its prime and if the wine is good. It will also give you something to talk about at wine tasting events.

Randi Glazer enjoys wine tasting in her spare time. She is a driven senior underwriting professional who has a proven track record in creating profitable books of businesses across multiple industries.

Advertisements

About Randi Glazer

Randi Glazer is a senior underwriting professional who has a track record of building profitable books of business.
This entry was posted in Randi Glazer and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s